Browsing Tag

Redemption Blu-ray

  • Reviews

    Zombie Lake (1981)

    Originally published in Bleeding Skull! A 1980s Trash-Horror Odyssey. When people don’t show up for work in the United States, they get fired. No one is happy. When people don’t show…

  • Reviews

    Grapes Of Death, The (1978)

    In Laurel & Hardy’s Our Relations, Mr. Hardy says, “You can trust me insipidly.” It’s one of their most indelible puns. There’s a good reason for that. Ten minutes into The…

  • Reviews

    Killer’s Moon (1978)

    Viddy I-wasn’t-sure-at-first-but-now-that-I-think-about-it-I’m-feeling-kinda-well, my brothers. I don’t want to mislead you. Killer’s Moon is not a strict derivative of A Clockwork Orange. At least, not in the meta-enhanced sense that emboldens Eloy…

  • Reviews

    Nude Vampire, The (1970)

    “Film critics are writers, and they are hostile and uneasy in the presence of a visual phenomenon.” That quote appears in Gregory Battock’s 1967 paperback, The New American Cinema. The speaker…

  • Reviews

    Iron Rose, The (1973)

    You can never be too patient. For the past fifty years, French trash dilettante Jean Rollin has steadily cultivated an obsession with breasts, pubes, and their respective placement within the canon…

  • Reviews

    Flesh And Blood Show, The (1972)

    Pete Walker made horror films that get the blood pumping. After a slew of fun 1960s softcore romps, creeps became Walker’s stock and trade. Combining social angst with stylized exploitation, Walker…

  • Reviews

    Erotic Rites Of Frankenstein, The (1972)

    You’ve got to fight for your rites. Reverb flutters from the coattails of Dracula, Prisoner Of Frankenstein and there lies The Rites Of Frankenstein. A direct-yet-indirect follow up to the supreme…

  • Reviews

    Schizo (1976)

    In line at the grocery store, I hoped that Samantha was going to be OK. Driving home, I hoped nothing terrible happened to Alan. Making breakfast the next morning, I tried…

  • Reviews

    Frightmare (1974)

    In 1962, The Crystals sang, “He’s a rebel and he’ll never ever be understood.” The Phil Spector production was a runaway #1 hit in the U.S., but peaked at #19 on…